Skinny trousers made bigger

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I have 2 daughters and each gave me a pair of trousers to refashion.

The first (patterned) pair had a broken side zip.  I tried these on hoping I could just replace the zip and they would be good to go.  Unfortunately they were too small. They were from New Look, 71% viscose, 26% polyester, 3% elastane, made in Cambodia.  The label was actually stuck in the zip.

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The second (plain black) pair were a good fit but looking a bit worn.  They were from George at Asda, and the fabric label was unreadable due to extensive washing but I would say they were mainly cotton with a similar elastane content to the other pair.

I decided to use a full length strip from the black pair to make the patterned pair bigger, using the ‘tuxedo’ method.

 

I have noticed that this kind of style is a common design feature in RTW, I even have some RTW running trousers myself which are like that.

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I had never used this method before and did a bit of research before giving it a try – useful information was here

I unpicked the recipient trouser side seams but just cut a strip from the donor trousers from the side seam area.  The strip was 3.5 inches wide, to include seam allowances. This was just a bit of a guess but as both fabrics had some elastane content I guessed it would work.

I don’t have a serger but I do have a reasonably good regular machine.  Its a Janome décor computer and has 50 different stitches programmed in, most of which I have never used.

After reading some tip online about how to sew stretch fabrics without a serger, I studied the manual which came with my machine and found that 3 of the 50 stitches were in fact ‘stretch stitches’

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Look at numbers 5 and 18 – they don’t look very interesting in a diagram but I they are both ‘stretch’ stitches and therefore interesting for my project.  Number 5 is for seams, works like zig zag stitch but better because the seam lies flatter, 18 is a stronger stitch, ideal for jeans I thought.  I will be using these stitches again and also reading more of the manual.

The method was quite quick and easy to use, I had it finished in a day which is unusual for me.  Only issue was adjusting the tension for some of the thicker parts around the waistband.

I could just about pull the trousers up without any fastenings but adding a zip from the donor trousers made it easier.

I also added the back pockets from the black trousers.

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After a bit of loose thread tidying they were ready.

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