linen

Men’s linen shirt refashion

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It seems I am currently stuck in some kind of pale blue linen refashioning loop as the last item I tackled was also pale blue linen.

Inspired by the refashioners 2015 challenge, (refashion a shirt), I went looking for a good condition large size shirt to work on. The challenge had finished already but it had provided lots of fresh ideas.

The shirt cost £3.49 from a Salvation Army shop and was an extra large Marks and Spencer Blue Harbour range item in 100% linen, made in Bangladesh.  It looked barely worn and was a nice sky blue colour.

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The idea was to make some sort of simple loose linen top.

As it was plain blue, this other shirt in 100% cotton, given to me by my stepson, was going to be used to add interest.

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Unfortunately this checked shirt was a small size and had lots of seams all over it.  The pockets were also tiny and not much use for anything.

I cut off the arms and shoulders of the main shirt, sewed up the button placket, made new shoulder seams and ‘tried it on’.

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Because there was plenty of spare fabric I had already decided just to sew up the button placket and cut it off, but was undecided whether to have the resulting seam at the back or the front.  I went for the back ie the shirt would be refashioned with the back at the front, so the pocket had to come off.

Next step was to add a few darts from the neckline for shaping.

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Linen is not the most difficult fabric to work with but it is not the easiest either.  Its very good at fraying,  and you can iron it but 5 minutes later the creases are back. Those darts gave me some trouble getting them even on each side.

I finished the neck with bias binding made from the checked shirt.

Having the back at the front meant the shoulder seams did not sit exactly in the right place but it didn’t look too bad and making the armholes smaller helped a bit.

I was going to add sleeves from the contrast shirt and actually made some,  but they didn’t look as good as no sleeves.  Bias binding it was then, to finish the armholes.

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I made final adjustments to the fit by taking in more fabric at the back seam where the placket still sat, and a bit on the sides as well.  When I was happy with it I cut all the excess fabric from the now very thick seams. I try to leave this trimming to the last possible moment in case a mistake has been made.

Finally I reduced the top to the length I wanted.  As the top was so simple I made a curved hem at the side seams, using a small plate to draw the curve, but it would have been better if I’d made the curve less rounded. The contrast bias trim balanced the neckline.

Here is the finished top, 30 seconds after ironing.

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I haven’t got any more pale blue linen left so my next refashion will have to be something different.

Linen tunic refashion

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This top is a refashion of a refashion.

Here is the previous transformation:

 

This was one of my favourite refashions to wear,  I liked the linen I liked the blue, I liked the check trim.

On its last pass though the laundry I decided the armpits and rope neckline were too worn to be seen out in public again.

I had an idea to replace those worn out elements with some contrasting pink fabric (also linen but with a slightly closer weave) from my stash, and also set myself the challenge to complete the whole thing in 3 hours which is quick for me.

The first step was to cut off the worn out elements which just left a short hemmed and finished tube.

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I sewed on a couple of fabric panels to lengthen the tube roughly the right size to have enough fabric to make a simple straight up and down top.

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At this rough and ready stage I ‘tried it on’ get an idea where the join was going to fall, I didn’t want it to be on the bust apex,  and to find out where the armpits should be.

I sewed up the sides and top of the pink bits to make rough armholes and a neck, then tried on again.  Some unpicking and readjusting was involved to get things in the right place ( I had anticipated this and not backstitched)  and I obviously needed to do something to develop the neckline.

For the neck, which was currently much too high, I marked the centre front and cut down a 2 inch slit which was then folded under like so.  I re-attached the Superdry label for interest as it seemed to look right with the point of the triangle at the middle of the neckline.

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For the back of neck I cut a shorter 1 inch slit but folded under in the same way, creating a sort of diamond shape for the neck. Its a bit rough on the inside but it will do. I considered folding the fabric to the outside to make a collar but this would be more time consuming and more likely to go wrong.

Finally, I hemmed the armholes using a zig sag stitch, took the side seams in a little to make the fit a little snugger and added a few hand stiches in some places to tidy up.

I quite like this experimental method of making by continuous refitting and the whole process was quite quick.

I already like this new version of the old tunic.