Refashion

Dress to skirt refashion

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Starting items:

Dress, too small and too short, fabric a very lightweight polyester, viscose 3% elastane mix with some texture, made in Morocco.  There’s some difficult to see olive green in there as well as black and white.

Skirt, also too small and definitely too short, fabric 100% canvas weight cotton, broken zip.

Both items were originally from Primark, the epitome of fast fashion, and were given to me by daughter.

The plan was to combine them to make a skirt.

I was unsure at first if the two fabrics would work well together, because of the different weight and composition as well as the colours.

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I decided to go for it, the heavier green cotton would be used to lengthen and add weight to the dress fabric.

First step, chop the dress

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I know the cut is very high up the dress but I was unsure how much of the length could be used.  I tried this bottom section on, and although it was still small, the stretch in the fabric provided quite a lot of give, it didn’t look ridiculous, (but maybe not suitable for a blog photo)

The green skirt had quite a deep hem, so this was to ripped open, then cut two as wide as possible strips to sew onto the bottom of the dress.

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In the lengthening process it would be necessary to follow the flared shape of the dress, and as the skirt does not really flare I decided to make some pleats to make sure the shape looked right.  The skirt was constructed of panels so there was a natural place for each pleat to go.

I sewed the 2 skirt strips together to make one long one, and hemmed it.  Before turning the hem over, cutting into the serged seams to reduce bulk.

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Finished hemline with pleats.

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This adds a nice amount of length and weight.

The waistband:

The fabric is so lightweight and stretchy and does not fray.  I am going to leave it as it is for now,  just turning over the right amount for a supremely comfortable yoga type waistband. I’ll try it for a few wears and review the situation. Because the cut was made so high in the dress and above the natural waist, it seems to work without slipping down.

 

 

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A fail, a fix, a frill and some flowers

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I had some pink flowery stretch jersey fabric in mind to make up a top using the Walkley pattern, originally given free with a magazine.

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This design is very simple, just 2 pieces the same back and front, but the boat neck was a bit too wide the first time I made it.  Other users of the pattern had also reported the same problem of a too wide neck.

 

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This is the first Walkley  made (from an old t-shirt and contrast viscose)  I found the boat neck too wide.

Some adjustments were made to the shoulders and neck on the pattern which made the neck narrower.  Before cutting out my flowery fabric, which was a rather small piece with no room for error,  I decided to make up a toile to test if the pattern adjustments had worked.

Using a men’s t-shirt from my stash the upper section of the design was constructed, up to just under the armholes.  I am glad I did this because further modifications were needed to correct some gape at the neckline, job done.

 

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top section of pattern after multiple alterations to the neckline and shoulders

 

After a few days had passed,  I wondered if there was some way I could make this practice half piece into a wearable item.  I found a turquoise t-shirt in my stash, cut out the bottom part of the design, and sewed it onto the top half.

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Clearly this was never going to produce a perfect result because you would normally sew the pieces together to make a complete back or front first.  What really spoilt it was that the top t-shirt had a small white stripe in it and the stripe placement at the join hadn’t worked out well.  At first I tried to re-sew the top and bottom halves together along a stripe but this just meant one side of the t-shirt was longer than the other.

The only answer seemed to be to cover up the mess in some way.

I had noticed that a lot of items in the shops at the moment have frills sewn on in a late 70’s sort of way.  A frill in the middle of my creation would do the cover up job perfectly.

I cut out a strip of fabric 4 in wide from the turquoise t-shirt , hemmed it, and stitched it on, pleating as I went along, to make a frill.

The result is erm.. acceptable, it is never going to be anything other than casual wear but too good to go in the bin, I don’t like to waste fabric if I can help it even if its just a couple of old t-shirts.

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The frill placement is not quite straight, so it covers the white lines,  but its not very obvious when its being worn.

Bonus feature:

Here is the other top, for which the one above was a practice.  It is made up in a flowery stretch knit fabric, bought in Norway last year.  Its a photo like cherry blossom print.

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There was some urgency involved in its construction because I was on holiday with a friend when I bought the fabric and was meeting her again very soon, so I had to get this top made quickly if I wasn’t going to miss a showing off opportunity.

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Men’s linen shirt refashion

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It seems I am currently stuck in some kind of pale blue linen refashioning loop as the last item I tackled was also pale blue linen.

Inspired by the refashioners 2015 challenge, (refashion a shirt), I went looking for a good condition large size shirt to work on. The challenge had finished already but it had provided lots of fresh ideas.

The shirt cost £3.49 from a Salvation Army shop and was an extra large Marks and Spencer Blue Harbour range item in 100% linen, made in Bangladesh.  It looked barely worn and was a nice sky blue colour.

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The idea was to make some sort of simple loose linen top.

As it was plain blue, this other shirt in 100% cotton, given to me by my stepson, was going to be used to add interest.

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Unfortunately this checked shirt was a small size and had lots of seams all over it.  The pockets were also tiny and not much use for anything.

I cut off the arms and shoulders of the main shirt, sewed up the button placket, made new shoulder seams and ‘tried it on’.

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Because there was plenty of spare fabric I had already decided just to sew up the button placket and cut it off, but was undecided whether to have the resulting seam at the back or the front.  I went for the back ie the shirt would be refashioned with the back at the front, so the pocket had to come off.

Next step was to add a few darts from the neckline for shaping.

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Linen is not the most difficult fabric to work with but it is not the easiest either.  Its very good at fraying,  and you can iron it but 5 minutes later the creases are back. Those darts gave me some trouble getting them even on each side.

I finished the neck with bias binding made from the checked shirt.

Having the back at the front meant the shoulder seams did not sit exactly in the right place but it didn’t look too bad and making the armholes smaller helped a bit.

I was going to add sleeves from the contrast shirt and actually made some,  but they didn’t look as good as no sleeves.  Bias binding it was then, to finish the armholes.

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I made final adjustments to the fit by taking in more fabric at the back seam where the placket still sat, and a bit on the sides as well.  When I was happy with it I cut all the excess fabric from the now very thick seams. I try to leave this trimming to the last possible moment in case a mistake has been made.

Finally I reduced the top to the length I wanted.  As the top was so simple I made a curved hem at the side seams, using a small plate to draw the curve, but it would have been better if I’d made the curve less rounded. The contrast bias trim balanced the neckline.

Here is the finished top, 30 seconds after ironing.

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I haven’t got any more pale blue linen left so my next refashion will have to be something different.

Linen tunic refashion

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This top is a refashion of a refashion.

Here is the previous transformation:

 

This was one of my favourite refashions to wear,  I liked the linen I liked the blue, I liked the check trim.

On its last pass though the laundry I decided the armpits and rope neckline were too worn to be seen out in public again.

I had an idea to replace those worn out elements with some contrasting pink fabric (also linen but with a slightly closer weave) from my stash, and also set myself the challenge to complete the whole thing in 3 hours which is quick for me.

The first step was to cut off the worn out elements which just left a short hemmed and finished tube.

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I sewed on a couple of fabric panels to lengthen the tube roughly the right size to have enough fabric to make a simple straight up and down top.

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At this rough and ready stage I ‘tried it on’ get an idea where the join was going to fall, I didn’t want it to be on the bust apex,  and to find out where the armpits should be.

I sewed up the sides and top of the pink bits to make rough armholes and a neck, then tried on again.  Some unpicking and readjusting was involved to get things in the right place ( I had anticipated this and not backstitched)  and I obviously needed to do something to develop the neckline.

For the neck, which was currently much too high, I marked the centre front and cut down a 2 inch slit which was then folded under like so.  I re-attached the Superdry label for interest as it seemed to look right with the point of the triangle at the middle of the neckline.

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For the back of neck I cut a shorter 1 inch slit but folded under in the same way, creating a sort of diamond shape for the neck. Its a bit rough on the inside but it will do. I considered folding the fabric to the outside to make a collar but this would be more time consuming and more likely to go wrong.

Finally, I hemmed the armholes using a zig sag stitch, took the side seams in a little to make the fit a little snugger and added a few hand stiches in some places to tidy up.

I quite like this experimental method of making by continuous refitting and the whole process was quite quick.

I already like this new version of the old tunic.

Turquoise trousers to tote transformation.

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I made a new bag for taking to work.  As my job is 12 hour night shifts, the bag has to be big enough to fit generous supplies of food, drink, clothing and entertainment in.

The dimensions were based roughly on my old bag, bought new a couple of years ago from a local shop.  It looks OK in the photo but has already been subject to a few repairs, has been washed a few times and is looking a bit past it.

 

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Old bag

I had some fabric in mind bought at a jumble sale last year very cheaply, probably meant for curtains, it is some kind of open fairly thick linen.  I got rather excited to see some actual fabric on sale and snapped it up without a plan.

 

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Jumble sale curtain fabric

I needed a contrast fabric and this pair of trousers BNWT left behind by a passing girlfriend of my stepson, seemed to work well.  They were a similar weight canvas 100% cotton in bright turquoise and the  pockets could be used for my signature 2 pockets made into one for the front of the bag.

 

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Turquoise canvas trousers for contrast fabric

I cut 5 pieces the sizes and shapes I needed using measurements taken from the old bag.

 

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Pieces cut out and interfaced

I haven’t made a bag like this before so it was a learning curve and I wanted to do it properly so heavy duty interfacing was applied to the main pieces .

The interfacing didn’t seem to stick that well so I ended up sewing it in, leading to a visible extra line of stitching that I will have to live with.

There was also going to be a lining.

 

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Slippy lining fabric

This used to be a long skirt,  previously used to make a top.  The original charity shop skirt was the last item of clothing I bought before giving up shopping for a year, I have another 6 months to complete the no shopping year.

 

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Skirt which was the source of lining fabric

 

The lining fabric was slippery and unpleasant to work with.  The top previously made from it  …..

 

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Previously made and blogged top, imperfect due to poor handling of slippery fabric.

 

doesn’t quite hang right because something went slightly wrong in the  cutting out and although I do wear the top,  am always aware of its failings.

I remembered a tip about spraying slippery fabrics with spray starch to make them easier to work with.  I didn’t have any spray starch but did have hairspray and this worked surprisingly well.  I sprayed each piece before sewing and it made quite a difference, and made the pieces smell nice.

I wanted an internal and external pocket and these were sewn on to the relevant  pieces first, bearing in mind where their final placement was to be once seams and handles were taken into account

The next stage was to sew up the base and side pieces into one strip, then attach the front and back.

 

 

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In progress bag without handles

The handles were interfaced and I used a few hand stitches  at the internal corners to keep the lining held in place.

 

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Interior of finished bag

I am almost looking forward to going to work to test this bag out.

 

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Finished bag

 

 

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Finished bag

 

 

 

 

Spider t-shirt

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I had some fun with this simple t-shirt embellishment.

It started with a a plain cotton Marks and Spencer t-shirt, bought last year in a charity shop for £1, intending to tart it up in some way .

Inspiration came from pinterest.

I selected a suitable button from my stash and drew a spider on some tracing-type paper so I could copy it onto the fabric.

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The original post involves drawing legs around the button but I wanted to sew them. A patch of interfacing was needed to stabilise the back of the t-shirt where the spider would be sited.  My idea was to sew through both paper and t-shirt with a contrasting yellow thread, then rip the paper off and be left with the spider transferred to the t-shirt.  It didn’t work that well to be honest, the paper I used was too thick and the yellow thread difficult to get rid of afterwards.

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The spider legs involved hand sewing on the basic shape with a running stich then hand sewing at 90 degrees over the legs with small stiches until it looked about right.  If this sounds like quite a lot of hand sewing, it was, but I don’t mind hand sewing on this type of project, in fact I find  it quite relaxing, also this method produced a sort of spidery hairiness on the legs.

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It looks better with the button sewn over the top.

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I sewed on some lace from my stash to complete the web on the neckline, again with hand stitches, and finally got the machine out to sew the spider’s thread, finishing off by tying the loose threads in a knot instead of backstitching.

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The spider looks like it’s dangling towards the centre, but when being worn it hangs down straight.

Pleased with my efforts I showed it to my husband and he said it looked like a spider was hiding behind  a button.

Trousers to dress refashion

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Toile for refashioners 2016

For my entry for the refashioners 2016, when I made a dress from jeans (see earlier blog post), I had made a toile for the bodice and although it was a bit rough and ready, had always intended to continue this to a dress in its own right.

The bodice was made from a pair of 100% cotton trousers by ‘no fear’ which I had bought at the end of a jumble sale when they were just desperate to sell anything and had a ‘fill a bag for a pound’ offer.   The binding for the bodice was made from an old pillow case.

I looked through my stash for some suitable fabric to make the skirt and decided to use this the remainder of this long dress.

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charity shop long dress 100% viscose, made in Turkey, cost £5
 I bought this dress last year in an independent charity shop, I was attracted by the fabric  and the amount of it.

Charity shopping tip: look to the floor

When I’m scanning the rails of any charity shop, it’s sometimes difficult to see everything because the items are tightly packed, so I always cast my eye to the floor to see if there are any long items with good fabrics, and that’s how I picked this out.

These independent shops are always the ones which throw up the best finds.  The bigger chains have become quite expensive and the items for sale can be on the bland side. The independents tend to be less discerning about what they put out on sale.  In this one I remember a particularly striking lime green leather jacket, which I wish I had photographed.

The dress was too small and revealing for me to wear but I’d bought it for the fabric anyway so I chopped off the top half and just kept the skirt.

I’d already used some of the fabric in an unblogged t-shirt refashion.

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top already made using old t- shirt and some of the dress fabric
 I needed a third element to have enough fabric to complete my dress and this time the stash turned up an unworn pair of white cotton trousers.

These trousers were left behind by a former girlfriend of my stepson, I don’t think she’ll be coming back to claim them.  They are a good make and maybe I should have taken them to a charity shop instead of cutting them up, but in my experience the shops are full of items in small sizes whereas the buyers tend to be looking for bigger sizes so that’s my justification.

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New ‘Monsoon’ trousers, 98% cotton, 2% elastane, also made in Turkey, free.
 Its funny but various different girlfriends have left items behind, I’ve got a scarf, a jacket and 2 pairs of trousers,  and a handbag, so virtually a whole outfit.

I wondered how best to fit the 3 elements together

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seeing how it would look
I made some measurements and there was a difference of 20 inches in the bodice width and the skirt width so I cut 8 panel shapes from the trousers in the right length and shape to fill the gap, basing the length I was aiming for on my denim dress.

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denim dress for which bodice was a toile
 At this stage it was going so well I was almost tempted to keep it as a peplum top.

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trouser panels attached to bodice
Finally, the tube of skirt fabric was added, and with a small amount of tweaking of the panels to improve the hang (making the front middle seam bigger), it was ready.

 

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Finished dress

I wore this dress in a recent trip to Seville, the red almost looks a bit Spanish?

 

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On the roof of Seville Cathedral
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Spectacular views from the cathedral rooftops

 

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Christopher Columbus is buried in Seville Cathedral
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The many orange trees were in blossom and the smell was wonderful