top

A fail, a fix, a frill and some flowers

Posted on

I had some pink flowery stretch jersey fabric in mind to make up a top using the Walkley pattern, originally given free with a magazine.

20170718_135737-1

This design is very simple, just 2 pieces the same back and front, but the boat neck was a bit too wide the first time I made it.  Other users of the pattern had also reported the same problem of a too wide neck.

 

20161102_115723-1[1]
This is the first Walkley  made (from an old t-shirt and contrast viscose)  I found the boat neck too wide.

Some adjustments were made to the shoulders and neck on the pattern which made the neck narrower.  Before cutting out my flowery fabric, which was a rather small piece with no room for error,  I decided to make up a toile to test if the pattern adjustments had worked.

Using a men’s t-shirt from my stash the upper section of the design was constructed, up to just under the armholes.  I am glad I did this because further modifications were needed to correct some gape at the neckline, job done.

 

20170718_114229-1
top section of pattern after multiple alterations to the neckline and shoulders

 

After a few days had passed,  I wondered if there was some way I could make this practice half piece into a wearable item.  I found a turquoise t-shirt in my stash, cut out the bottom part of the design, and sewed it onto the top half.

20170717_190240-1.jpg

Clearly this was never going to produce a perfect result because you would normally sew the pieces together to make a complete back or front first.  What really spoilt it was that the top t-shirt had a small white stripe in it and the stripe placement at the join hadn’t worked out well.  At first I tried to re-sew the top and bottom halves together along a stripe but this just meant one side of the t-shirt was longer than the other.

The only answer seemed to be to cover up the mess in some way.

I had noticed that a lot of items in the shops at the moment have frills sewn on in a late 70’s sort of way.  A frill in the middle of my creation would do the cover up job perfectly.

I cut out a strip of fabric 4 in wide from the turquoise t-shirt , hemmed it, and stitched it on, pleating as I went along, to make a frill.

The result is erm.. acceptable, it is never going to be anything other than casual wear but too good to go in the bin, I don’t like to waste fabric if I can help it even if its just a couple of old t-shirts.

20170718_124341-1

The frill placement is not quite straight, so it covers the white lines,  but its not very obvious when its being worn.

Bonus feature:

Here is the other top, for which the one above was a practice.  It is made up in a flowery stretch knit fabric, bought in Norway last year.  Its a photo like cherry blossom print.

20170718_123106-1

There was some urgency involved in its construction because I was on holiday with a friend when I bought the fabric and was meeting her again very soon, so I had to get this top made quickly if I wasn’t going to miss a showing off opportunity.

IMG-20170722-WA0000

Long skirt to top refashion

Posted on

I bought this long skirt because I was attracted to the large amount of fabric and attractive border and it cost me £3.49, which was 10% of the original, still attached, price tag of £35.

20161029_191212-11

The fabric was 100% polyester and there was a short gauzy white underskirt which I ended up using for facings.

20161029_191230-11

 

My plan was to make a top, using a pattern given to me by a friend, incorporating the border of the skirt and the original hem.

The fabric was very light and floaty and the brand was ‘Glamorous’, one I had never heard of.  I looked it up and it appears to be an online shop of the type that claims to offer massive discounts. I don’t think that glamorous would have been my first choice of description for the original skirt though.

20161031_091529-11

When I started cutting the pattern pieces out, it became obvious that this fabric was trouble.  It slipped and frayed all over the place,  even after weighing  it down in every place possible.

My newly and expensively purchased ‘walking foot’ did help in the actual sewing though.

20161031_1530341

Here is the finished top.  It will be good for travelling light because it takes up only the space of a light scarf and doesn’t really crease.

20161031_091706-11

 

Bonus feature: Refashionables in Modern Art

20161014_153946-11

On a recent trip to Tate Liverpool I was drawn to the above exhibit by Michelangelo Pistoletto  entitled  ‘Venus of the rags’ .  The description describes the mound of clothes as  ‘the detritus of modern society’ but I was thinking ‘that looks like a rather nice vintage scarf’

20161014_1542171